These are the top 10 'slang words' kids use that parents don't understand

16 April 2019, 12:28 | Updated: 16 April 2019, 13:39

Confused
Picture: Getty

By Giorgina Ramazzotti

New research reveals the top ten slang words kids use that their parents struggle to fathom - with a huge 86% of parents saying they don't understand modern slang.

"Obvs", "sick" and "awks" are among the words most commonly used, with parents admitting their children use about three words a day that they don't understand the meaning of.

The new research carried out by ODEON cinemas says that other words such as "sick", "savage" and "squad" are baffling British parents.

The top five kids slang words were revealed to be "Obvs" meaning ‘obviously’ (53%), "Sick" meaning something great (49%), "Awks" meaning ‘awkward’ (41%), "Squad" meaning "a group of friends" (26%) and "Savage" meaning someone who has done something considered bold or feisty (24%).

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The company's research also looked at what parent's misinterpret their children's slang to mean.

Among the most common were parents believing the term "lit" to mean literally, when in modern day slang it refers to something that was awesome; "Safe" to mean secure, when in modern slang it actually refers to being in agreement with something; "AFS" to mean "always forever seriously" when it's actually an online acronym for "Away From Screen".

TOP 10 WORDS PARENTS MOST COMMONLY HEAR THEIR KIDS SAYING 

"Obvs" meaning "obviously" (53%)

"Sick" meaning something great (49%)

"Awks" meaning "awkward" (41%)

"Squad" meaning "a group of friends" (26%)

"Savage" meaning someone who has done something considered bold or feisty (24%)

"Safe" meaning something is good or to agree with something (19%)

"Rage Quitting" meaning when a person quits a video game because they're losing (17%)

"Lit" meaning when something is fun/cool (16%)Deep meaning emotional (15%)

"Triggered" meaning something that has annoyed them (12%)

ODEON commissioned the research to develop a new training programme to teach their staff about kids slang, helping them better communicate with child guests.